Monday, June 21, 2010

Roman Catholicism Can Thwart The Internet Spread of 'Heresies'



Message from Avles:

http://wwwfreespeechbeneathushs.blogspot.com/2006/11/stephen-devoy_26.html#comments

http://cyc.com/cyc/company/news/OpenCyc%20Brings%20Meaning%20to%20the%20Web

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OpenCyc is a wide-ranging and increasingly comprehensive ontology that describes things and events in the world in logical terms that computers can reason about. Its purpose is to provide a shared vocabulary for Web applications, allowing them to automatically reason about, and integrate, the content of web sites and web services. The OpenCyc ontology and knowledge base goes beyond tag-sets, taxonomies, and other reference vocabularies, because it has been designed and extensively tested for use in automated reasoning. As Andraž Tori, CTO of Zemanta Ltd. sees it,


"Common semantic vocabularies are the missing link for the semantic web. Blogs cover an incredible range of subjects, so meaning-based content integration using the huge OpenCyc ontology can provide an amazing user experience for bloggers and other content authors."

(ontology:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology_%28information_science%29)
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This is the way of the routine control, how they controls the search engines in order you avoid to find an object or you to discover what they want.

Thursday, June 17, 2010
INTERNET IS A N.A.T.O. MILITARY BATTLEFIELD!
http://avlesbeluskesexposed.blogspot.com/2010/06/internet-is-nato-military-battlefield.html

(I hope they don't manipulate this message!)

6/17/2010 4:41 AM

About the President and CEO of Cycorp developing this technology, Douglas Lenat:

http://cyc.com/cyc/company/lenat



Doug is one of the world's leading computer scientists, and is both the founder of the CYC® project and the president of Cycorp. He has been a Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie-Mellon University and Stanford University. He is a prolific author, whose hundreds of publications include the books


Knowledge Based Systems in Artificial Intelligence (1982, McGraw-Hill)
Building Expert Systems (1983, Addison-Wesley)
Knowledge Representation (1988, Addison-Wesley)
Building Large Knowledge Based Systems (1989, Addison-Wesley)

His 1976 Stanford thesis earned him the bi-annual IJCAI Computers and
Thought Award in 1977.

He was one of the original Fellows of the AAAI (American Association for
Artificial Intelligence).


From Wikipedia:

Douglas B. Lenat (born in 1950) is the CEO of Cycorp, Inc. of Austin, Texas, and has been a prominent researcher in artificial intelligence, especially machine learning (with his AM and Eurisko programs), knowledge representation, blackboard systems, and "ontological engineering" (with his Cyc program at MCC and at Cycorp). He has also worked in military simulations and published a critique of conventional random-mutation Darwinism[citation needed] based on his experience with Eurisko. Lenat was one of the original Fellows of the AAAI.

Lenat's quest, in the Cyc project, to build the basis of a general artificial intelligence by manually representing knowledge in the formal language, CycL, based on extensions to first-order predicate calculus has not been without its critics, among them many members of the MIT hacker culture. It is perhaps for this reason that "bogosity" is jokingly said to be measured in microlenats according to the Jargon File, the lenat being considered too large for practical use.

At the University of Pennsylvania, Lenat received his Bachelor's degree in Mathematics and Physics, and his Master's degree in Applied Mathematics in 1972. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (published in Knowledge-based systems in artificial intelligence, along with the Ph.D. thesis of Randall Davis, McGraw-Hill, 1982) in 1976. His advisor was Professor Edward Feigenbaum.

In 1976 Lenat started teaching at Carnegie-Mellon and commenced his work on Eurisko, but returned to Stanford in a teaching role in 1978. His continuing work on Eurisko led to attention in 1982 from DARPA and MCC in Austin, Texas. In 1984 he left Stanford to commence work on Cyc[1], the fruits of which were spun out of MCC into Cycorp in 1994. In 1986, he estimated the effort to complete Cyc would be 250,000 rules and 350 man-years of effort[2].

As of 2006, Lenat continues his work on Cyc at Cycorp. He is also a member of TTI/Vanguard's advisory board.

Quotes

"Intelligence is ten million rules."

"The time may come when a greatly expanded Cyc will underlie countless software applications. But reaching that goal could easily take another two decades." [3]

"Once you have a truly massive amount of information integrated as knowledge, then the human-software system will be superhuman, in the same sense that mankind with writing is superhuman compared to mankind before writing."

References
Lenat, Douglas. "Hal's Legacy: 2001's Computer as Dream
and Reality. From 2001 to 2001: Common Sense and the Mind of HAL". Cycorp, Inc..
http://www.cyc.com/cyc/technology/halslegacy.html. Retrieved 2006-09-26.

The Editors of Time-Life Books (1986). Understanding Computers: Artificial
Intelligence. Amsterdam: Time-Life Books. pp. 84. ISBN 0-7054-0915-5.

TechnologyReview.com (March 2005)
The Editors of Time-Life Books (1986).
Understanding Computers: Artificial Intelligence. Amsterdam: Time-Life Books.
pp. 81–84. ISBN 0-7054-0915-5.
"Beyond the Semantic Web" video lecture at NIPS 2008.
"How David Beats Goliath" article at The New Yorker.
Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Lenat


Categories:
Fellows of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence
Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 1950 births
Living people Artificial intelligence researchers

About some of his work from CNN article dated February 12, 2003

Doug Lenat, president of Cycorp, says his researchers have built the beginnings of a system to identify calling patterns between suspected terrorists.

Financed by more than $20 million in government contracts, researchers are taking the first steps toward developing a system that could sift through the financial, telephone, travel and medical records of millions of people in hopes of identifying terrorists before they strike. So far, the companies awarded contracts by the Defense Department are using only fabricated data in their work on the program, which is called Total Information Awareness.

The Pentagon's technology chief, Pete Aldridge, has said the department is interested in tying together such privately held data as credit card records, bank transactions, car rental receipts and gun purchases, along with massive quantities of intelligence information already gathered by the federal government.

The project has met some resistance in Congress because of privacy concerns. Some lawmakers are pushing an amendment to a spending bill that would prohibit the system from ever gathering information on American citizens without a congressional vote approving it.

Meanwhile, contractors and researchers told The Associated Press that they have already been developing pieces of TIA.

For example, Doug Lenat, president of Texas-based Cycorp, said his researchers had already built a system to identify phone-calling patterns as they might exist among potential terrorists overseas.

Other TIA contractors include defense giant Raytheon and Telcordia, an elecommunications company specializing in research and development. Several
other companies have been waiting to finalize deals.

So far, contractors have worked with fake data, things like made-up telephone numbers and receipts that look like real consumer records, but aren't, according to interviews and public records.

Aldridge outlined the program in a news conference in November after questions arose about the choice of John Poindexter to head TIA.

The former admiral and national security adviser to President Reagan has been a lightning rod.

A figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, he was convicted on charges of lying to Congress, destroying official documents and obstructing a congressional investigation. The verdicts were overturned on appeal.

From the start, the idea of TIA has proven controversial, pitting national security worries against fears the government would run roughshod over individual privacy.

"We're talking about the most expansive, far reaching surveillance program ever proposed. The Congress has got to take a stand here," said Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, who has led efforts to restrict TIA.

Pentagon officials declined repeated interview requests by AP for this story. After coming under earlier Senate criticism, the Defense Department named a TIA oversight panel and issued a news release denying it is building a gigantic database.

However, a document that was part of the department's bid solicitation for the TIA said "the term 'database' is intended to convey a new kind of extremely large, omni-media, virtually-centralized and semantically rich information repository."

Peter Higgins, a consultant and former CIA chief information officer, said what officials wanted from TIA was a system that would use relevant private and government compiled information to spot patterns or convergences.

For example, a government-collected list of every person treated for anthrax exposure could help find people plotting a biological attack. Even more useful: finding people on that list who also telephone Afghanistan.

Electronic records are already ubiquitous in corporate America. Businesses keep lists of cardiac patients, BMW owners, subscribers to porn magazines, even people who tend to do their grocery shopping about the time they receive sales circulars, Higgins said.

Privacy laws governing the disclosure of personal electronic data vary widely, depending on the type of data.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act, for example, forbids credit bureaus from combining the data they collect about a customer's on-time payment history with data the bureaus sell to direct marketers. The Federal Election Commission allows the Republican and Democratic parties to sell lists of people who contribute.

The Pentagon began advertising for bids to work on TIA last March, inviting ideas to exploit "novel" information sources and new electronic research methods.

Overseeing the research is the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, or DARPA, the same office that developed the Internet. According to the published solicitation, DARPA planned a five-year timeline for TIA: three to develop ideas and demonstrations, two to build and expand on the most promising ones.

The TIA budget is $30 million from the current and past fiscal years.

In all, 26 bids were received, said DARPA spokeswoman Jan Walker. Four companies were awarded contracts. According to the TIA Web site, many other organizations were already working on pieces Poindexter planned to connect to TIA.

The companies included:

• Cycorp, based in Austin, Texas, which was awarded $9.8 million to work on a prototype database. The company specializes in searching data.


• Telcordia, based in Morristown, New Jersey, which won a $5.2 million contract to focus on connecting data already available within different government offices.


• Hicks Associates, of McLean, Virginia, which was awarded $3.6 million to study the feasibility of TIA, how it would develop, and to create a prototype.


• Booz, Allen & Hamilton, based in Falls Church, Virginia, which won a $1.5 million contract. Its purpose was not publicly disclosed.

Raytheon Co., based in Lexington, Massachusetts, which confirmed that it is under contract with DARPA. Spokesman David Shay declined to outline Raytheon's specific role.

Another research firm, RAND Corp., based in Santa Monica, California, confirmed it was expecting to work on TIA. Neither the company nor the Pentagon would provide details.





See:

Stephen Devoy
http://wwwfreespeechbeneathushs.blogspot.com/2006/11/stephen-devoy_26.html


Appendum, June 22, 2010:

Douglas Lenat's name appears within the November 1999 conference

PARTICIPANTS IN THE RAND/NIC INFORMATION REVOLUTION CONFERENCES THE NOVEMBER 1999 CONFERENCE ON SOCIETAL TRENDS DRIVEN BY THE INFORMATION REVOLUTION

Dr. Jon B. Alterman (United States) Middle East Program Officer, United States Institute of Peace Professor Kim V. Andersen (Denmark) Department of Informatics, Copenhagen Business School

Dr. Robert H. Anderson (United States) Senior Information Scientist and Head, Information Sciences Group, RAND

Professor Vallampadugai S. Arunachalam (India) Engineering & Public Policy Department and Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Dr. Tora Kay Bikson (United States) Senior Behavioral Scientist, RAND

Mr. Taylor Boas (United States) Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Professor Paul Bracken (United States) School of Management, Yale University

Mr. Clinton C. Brooks (United States) Corporate Knowledge Strategist, National Security Agency
Professor Eric Brousseau (France) Centre ATOM, Universite de Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne


The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Professor William Caelli (Australia) School of Data Communications, Queensland University of Technology

Mr. Colin Crook (United States) Senior Fellow, Wharton School; Former Senior Technology Officer, Citibank

Dr. James Dewar (United States) Senior Mathematician, RAND

Dr. William Drake (United States) Senior Associate and Director of the Project on the Information Revolution and World Politics, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Professor Francis Fukuyama (United States) Institute of Public Policy, George Mason University

Dr. Lawrence K. Gershwin (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council

Mr. David C. Gompert (United States) Vice President, National Security Research Division; Director, National Defense Research Institute, RAND

Professor Sy Goodman (United States) University of Arizona, Georgia Tech, and Stanford University

Dr. David Gordon (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Economics and Global Issues, National Intelligence Council

Dr. Jerrold Green (United States) Senior Political Scientist, Director of International Development; Director, Center for Middle East Public Policy, RAND

Dr. Eugene C. Gritton (United States) Director, Acquisition and Technology Policy Program, RAND

Dr. Richard O. Hundley (United States) Senior Physical Scientist, RAND
Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants 149

Dr. Paul Kozemchak (United States) Special Assistant to the Director, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Dr. John Kriese (United States) Chief Scientist, Defense Intelligence Agency

Ms. Ellen Laipson (United States) Vice Chairman, National Intelligence Council

Dr. Martin Libicki (United States) Senior Policy Analyst, RAND

Mr. John Mabberley (United Kingdom) Managing Director, DERAtec, Defence Evaluation and Research Agency

Ms. Yuko Maeda (Japan) Nomura Research Institute America
Professor Mark Mason (United States) School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Mr. Hideo Miyashita (Japan) General Manager, Center for Cyber Communities Initiative, Nomura Research Institute Ltd.

Dr. James Mulvenon (United States) Associate Political Scientist, RAND

Dr. C. Richard Neu (United States) Senior Economist and Associate Director, Project Air Force, RAND

Mr. Yoshiyuki Noguchi (Japan) President, Nomura Research Institute America

Dr. William Nolte (United States) Director, Outreach and Strategic Planning, National Intelligence Council
Professor M. J. Norton (United Kingdom) Head of Electronic Business, Institute of Directors

The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Mr. Ian Pearson (United Kingdom) Futurologist, British Telecommunications Laboratories
Professor Larry Press (United States) Chairman, CIS Department, California State University at Dominguez Hills

Ms. Betsy Quint-Moran (United States) Strategic Assessments Group, Office of Transnational Issues, Central Intelligence Agency

Dr. Enid Schoettle (United States) Special Advisor to the Chairman, National Intelligence Council
Dr. Brian Shaw (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council
Professor Ernest Wilson (United States) Director, Center for International Development and Conflict Management, University of Maryland at College Park

Mr. Robert Worden (United States) Federal Research Division, Library of Congress

Ms. Lily Wu (United States) Former Director, Equity Research, Salomon Smith Barney, Hong Kong and San Francisco; Currently Acting CFO, Disappearing Inc. and MovieQ.com

Mr. Boris Zhikharevich (Russia) Head, Strategic Planning Department, Leontief Centre, St. Petersburg

THE MAY 2000 CONFERENCE ON THE TECHNOLOGY DRIVERS OF THE INFORMATION REVOLUTION

Dr. Robert H. Anderson (United States) Senior Information Scientist and Head, Information Sciences Group, RAND

Dr. Philip Antón (United States) Senior Computer Scientist, RAND
Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants 151
Professor Vallampadugai S. Arunachalam (India) Engineering & Public Policy Department and Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Dr. Steven Bankes (United States) Senior Computer Scientist, RAND

Mr. John Baskin (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Economics and Global Issues, National Intelligence Council

Mr. Jeffrey Benjamin (United States) Senior Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Dr. Tora Kay Bikson (United States) Senior Behavioral Scientist, RAND

Dr. Joel Birnbaum (United States) Chief Scientist, Hewlett-Packard Company

Mr. Maarten Botterman (The Netherlands) Research Leader, RAND Europe
Professor William J. Caelli (Australia) School of Data Communications, Faculty of Information Technology, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Dr. Jonathan Caulkins (United States) Director, Pittsburgh Office, RAND

Mr. Colin Crook (United States) Senior Fellow, Wharton School; Former Senior Technology Officer, Citibank

Professor Peter Denning (United States) Computer Science Department, George Mason University

Dr. James Dewar (United States) Senior Mathematician and Director, Research Quality Assurance, RAND

The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Dr. David Farber (United States) Chief Technologist, Federal Communications Commission; Professor, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Robert Frederking (United States) Chair, Graduate Programs in Language Technology, Carnegie Mellon University

Professor Erol Gelenbe (United States) Associate Dean of Engineering & Computer Science University of Central Florida

Dr. Lawrence K. Gershwin (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology National Intelligence Council

Dr. Eugene C. Gritton (United States) Director, Acquisition and Technology Policy Program, RAND

Mr. Eric Harslem (United States) Senior Vice President of Products and Technology Strategy, Dell Computer Corporation

Mr. Stanley Heady (United States) Executive for Research Alliances, National Security Agency

Dr. Charles M. Herzfeld (United States) Independent Consultant

Dr. Richard O. Hundley (United States) Senior Physical Scientist, RAND

Mr. James M. Kearns (United States) Financial Design Inc.

Dr. Paul Kozemchak (United States) Special Assistant, Intelligence Liaison, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Dr. John T. Kriese (United States) Chief Scientist, Defense Intelligence Agency

Dr. Douglas Lenat (United States) President, CYCORP

Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants

Mr. David Marvit (United States) Director, Strategy, Disappearing Inc.
Professor Noel MacDonald (United States) Department of Mechanical & Environmental Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara

Dr. William Mularie (United States) Director, Information Systems Office, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Dr. C. Richard Neu (United States) Senior Economist, RAND

Dr. Edward C. Oliver (United States) Director, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Department of Energy

Professor Raj Reddy (United States) Herbert A. Simon University Professor, Carnegie Mellon University

Professor William L. Scherlis (United States) School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Dr. Enid Schoettle (United States) Special Advisor to the Chairman, National Intelligence Council
Dr. Brian Shaw (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council

Professor Mary Shaw (United States) School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Professor Robert Simon (United States) Department of Computer Science, George Mason University

Dr. Stephen L. Squires (United States) Special Assistant for Information Technology, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Mr. Phillip Webb (United Kingdom) Chief Information Officer,

The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Defence Evaluation and Research Agency, Farnborough,United Kingdom

Ms. Lily Wu (United States) Chief Financial Officer, XLinux Inc.

Mr. Rick E. Yannuzzi (United States) Senior Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Strategic and Nuclear Programs, National Intelligence Council

THE NOVEMBER 2000 CONFERENCE ON THE COURSE OF THE INFORMATION REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA

Dr. Robert H. Anderson (United States) Senior Information Scientist and Head, Information Sciences Group, RAND

Mr. Fulton T. Armstrong (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Latin America, National Intelligence Council

Mr. Diego Arria (Venezuela) Chairman, Technology Holdings International; Former Permanent Representative of Venezuela at the United Nations

Dr. John Baskin (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Economics and Global Issues, National Intelligence Council

Dr. Tora Kay Bikson (United States) Senior Behavioral Scientist, RAND
Professor Antonio Jose Junqueira Botelho (Brazil) Department of Politics and Sociology, Pontificial Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro

Mr. Juan Enriquez (Mexico) Researcher, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University;

Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants

Former CEO of Mexico City’s Urban Development Corporation; Coordinator General of Economic Policy and Chief of Staff to Mexico’s Secretary of State

Dr. Lawrence K. Gershwin (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council

Dr. David Gordon (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Economics and Global Issues, National Intelligence Council

Dr. Eugene C. Gritton (United States) Director, Acquisition and Technology Policy Program, RAND

Dr. Timothy Heyman (Mexico) President, Heyman y Asociados, S.C., Mexico City, Former President, ING Baring Grupo Financiero (Mexico)

Dr. Richard O. Hundley (United States) Senior Physical Scientist, RAND

Mr. Elliot Maxwell (United States) Special Advisor to the Secretary of Commerce for the Digital Economy, U.S. Department of Commerce Ms. Lee Mizell (United States) Doctoral Fellow, RAND Graduate School

Mr. William T. Ortman (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Latin America, National Intelligence Council

Mr. Jonathan Orszag (United States) Managing Director, Sebago Associates Inc.; Former Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce; Director of the Office of Policy and Strategic Planning, Department of Commerce

Mr. Ricardo Peon (Mexico) Manager of Telecoms and Internet Investments,

The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Heyman y Asociados, S.C., Mexico City;Former Managing Director, Deutsche Bank Mexico

Mr. Danilo Piaggesi (Italy) Head, Information Technologies for Development Division, Inter-American Development Bank

Professor Larry Press (United States) Chairman, CIS Department, California State University at Dominguez Hills

Dr. Susan Kaufman Purcell (United States) Vice President, The Council of the Americas, New York City

Dr. Angel Rabasa (United States) Senior Policy Analyst, RAND

Mr. David Rothkopf (United States) Chairman and Chief Executive, Intellibridge Corporation; Former Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade; Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Policy Development

Mr. Ricardo Setti (Brazil) Brazilian Journalist; Latin American Business Consultant

Dr. Brian Shaw (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council

Mr. Eduardo Talero (United States) Principal Informatics Specialist and Informatics Procurement Advisor, World Bank

Dr. Gregory Treverton (United States) Senior Consultant, RAND; Senior Fellow, Pacific Council on International Policy

Ms. Regina K. Vargo (United States) Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for the

Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants

Western Hemisphere,

U.S. Department of Commerce Mr. Robert A. Vitro (United States) Intersectoral, Regional and Special Programs, Information Technology for Development Division, Inter-American Development Bank

Professor Ernest Wilson (United States) Director, Center for International Development and Conflict Management, University of Maryland at College Park

Mr. Robert Worden (United States) Federal Research Division, Library of Congress

THE APRIL 2001 CONFERENCE ON THE COURSE OF THE INFORMATION REVOLUTION IN EUROPE

Dr. Robert H. Anderson (United States) Senior Information Scientist and Head, Information Sciences Group, RAND

Mr. Neil Bailey (United Kingdom) Managing Director, Empower Dynamics

Dr. Tora Kay Bikson (United States) Senior Behavioral Scientist, RAND

Dr. Carl Bildt (Sweden) Special United Nations Envoy for the Balkans; Former Prime Minister of Sweden; Member, Advisory Board, RAND Europe

Mr. Daniel Bircher (Switzerland) Head, Information and Process Security, Ernst Basler & Partners Ltd.

Mr. Maarten Botterman (The Netherlands) Program Director, Information and Communications Technology Policy Research, RAND Europe

158 The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Mr. J. C. Burgelman (Belgium) SMIT-VUB

Dr. Gabriella Cattaneo (Italy) Databank Consulting

Dr. Jonathan Cave (United States) Senior Economist, RAND Europe

Mr. Anders Comstedt (Sweden) President, Stokab

Ms. Renée Cordes (Belgium) Freelance Journalist, Brussels

Mr. Ian Culpin (Belgium) Martech International, Brussels

Ms. Carine Dartiguepeyrou (France) Consultant, RAND Europe Formerly of Solving International, Paris

Ms. Kitty de Bruin (The Netherlands) Director, NT FORUM

Mr. Pol Descamps (Belgium) Consultant, PTD Partners

Mr. Job Dittberner (United States) National Intelligence Council

Mr. Bob Ford (United Kingdom) Senior Research and Development Manager British Telecommunications

Dr. Lawrence K. Gershwin (United States) National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council

Dr. Eugene C. Gritton (United States) Director, Acquisition and Technology Policy Program, RAND

Mr. Kurt Haering (Switzerland) Director, Foundation InfoSurance, Zurich
Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants 159

Dr. Kris Halvorsen (Norway) Center Director, Solutions and Services Technologies, Hewlett Packard Laboratories

Professor Dr. Bernhard M. Hämmerli (Switzerland) Professor of Informatics, Communications and Security, Applied University of Technology, Lucerne
Dr. Andrej Heinke (Germany) DaimlerChrysler

Dr. Richard O. Hundley (United States) Senior Physical Scientist and Manager, Information Revolution Project, RAND

Col. Eng. Aurelian Ionescu (Romania) CIO and IT Advisor to State Secretary, Romania Ministry of National Defense, Bucharest

Dr. Suzanne Jantsch (Germany) Project Manager, Information Technology Communications, IABG

Dr. Peter Johnston (United Kingdom) Head of New Methods of Work, Information Society Directorate-General, European Commission
Professor Sergei Kapitza (Russia) Academy of Science, Moscow

Mr. Thomas Koeppel (Switzerland) Section Head, Service for Analysis and Prevention, Swiss Federal Office of Police, Bern

Mr. Ivo Kreiliger (Switzerland) Deputy Intelligence Coordinator, Assessment and Detection Bureau, Bern

Professor Eddie C. Y. Kuo (Singapore) Dean, School of Communication Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Mr. David Leevers (United Kingdom) VERS Associates
160 The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Mr. Stephan Libiszewski (Switzerland) Attaché for IT, Swiss Mission to NATO, Brussels

Dr. Erkki Liikanen (Finland) Commissioner, Enterprise and Information Society, European Commission

Professor Arun Mahizhan (Singapore) Deputy Director, Institute of Policy Studies, Singapore

Dr. Joan Majo (Spain) Institut Catalan de Tecnologia

Dr. John McGrath (RN retired) (United Kingdom) Ex Dean, Royal Navy Engineering College, Manadon

Dr. Adrian Mears (United Kingdom) Technical Director Defence Evaluation and Research Agency, Farnborough

Mr. Horace Mitchell (United Kingdom) Founder and CEO, Management Technology Associates

Dr. C. Richard Neu (United States) Senior Economist, RAND

Dr. Michelle Norgate (Switzerland) Center for Security Studies and Conflict Research, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich

Sir Michael Palliser (United Kingdom) Chairman, Advisory Board, RAND Europe; Former Vice Chairman, Samuel Montagu & Co., London

Dr. Sarah Pearce (United Kingdom) Parliamentary Office of Science & Technology, London
Mr. Ian Pearson (United Kingdom) Futurologist, British Telecommunications Laboratories

Dr. Robert Pestel (Germany) Senior Scientific Officer, Information Society Directorate-General, European Commission

Appendix: RAND/NIC Conference Participants 161

Prof. Richard Potter (United Kingdom) Defence Evaluation and Research Agency, Farnborough

Dr. Michel Saloff-Coste (France) MSC & Partners, Paris

Mr. Maurice Sanciaume (France) Government Affairs Manager Europe, Agilent Technologies Belgium

Dr. Brian Shaw (United States) Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology, National Intelligence Council

Mr. Mark Stead (United Kingdom) Member of the Director General Information Office of the Ministry of Defence

Mr. Eddie Stewart (United Kingdom) DERA Webmaster, Defence Evaluation and Research Agency Professor Reima Suomi (Finland) University of Turku, Finland

Ms. Pamela Taylor (United Kingdom) E-Business Policy Advisor, Confederation of British Industry

Mr. Tom Tesch (Belgium) Technical University of West Flanders, Kortrijk, Belgium

Professor Paul Van Binst (Belgium) Director, Telematics and Communications Services, Free University of Brussels

Mr. Lorenzo Veleri (United Kingdom) Policy Analyst, Kings College, London

Mr. Phillip Webb (United Kingdom) Chief Information Officer and Chief Knowledge Office, Defence Evaluation and Research Agency, Farnborough 162 The Global Course of the Information Revolution

Professor Raoul Weiler (Belgium) University of Louvain

Dr. Walter Widmer (Switzerland) Head, IT Security Switzerland, UBS


4 comments:

Steve Finnell said...

you are invited to follow my blog

Douglas A. Willinger said...

Very slow response on the "Steve Finnell" link.

avles said...

I especially noticed the years - for example:

----------------------------------
".....Douglas Lenat's name appears within the November 1999 conference ....."
----------------------------------

I am not an expert in informatic, I am the classical dummy of the famous series of dummies-support books, but I don't think I need a PhD at Stanford to understand that......

Saturday, June 26, 2010
Manipulating 'Common Sense'
http://avlesbeluskesexposed.blogspot.com/2010/06/blog-post.html

-------------------------------
".....I believe......"
..........
".......#2: at the opposite of what publicly declared, ontological filter CYC-like are just at work, probably since the birth of internet the same......."
-------------------------------

Probably it is born first the egg, and then the chicken. First they think to a technical possibility to manipulate the universality of human conscience, then they picked up the most fitted technology existing (the Internet of DARPA, for the defence against a nuclera attack, the CERN developing the vifrtual pages, and blah blah blah,

(I hope this message will not be submitted to the Ontological Internet/Roman Catholicism)

avles said...

-----------------------------
"....Financed by more than $20 million in government contracts, researchers are taking the first steps toward developing a system that could sift through the financial, telephone, travel and medical records of millions of people in hopes of identifying terrorists before they strike. So far, the companies awarded contracts by the Defense Department are using only fabricated data in their work on the program, which is called Total Information Awareness. ....."
-----------------------------

No thank you. This is the DISTRACTION. For Roman Catholic goals. Distract the rage of the people on the "Neocons" etc. (today Islam is no more believed to be a threat but the "victim" of Neocons).

Of course they need to control the purchase of guns etc., to avoid uprising against the traitors puppets of NWO, but I think that in this case the exposition of such criminal information war is strumental to distract the attention from the most important goal, that creation of the global collective mind, a goal Rome pursues since its foundation (and ever before, in Sumeria, Egypt, etc.).

People are focusing the attention on their purchases, on their guns etc., on MATERIAL transaction, and are pushed to freely discuss about it on the web.... But it is just this "free" discussion that is controlled by the Ontological Internet...meanwhile I write in the anti-NWO forums about the governmental spying activity on my financial transactions, the same (RC) government is manipulating the ideological content of my messages... I think a wonderful Chinese game of lights and shadows, typical a-la-general superior....